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Friday, December 26, A.D. 2008
Chesterton’s Father Brown

It is fitting on Boxing Day to honor a great Englishman. G.K. Chesterton was a fine wise man and quite a gift to modern English speaking people. He wrote in a wide variety of genres, including those of the crime solving sort, such as his Father Brown mysteries series, where the sleuth is an English priest.

John J. Miller has a series of radio webcasts called Between the Covers on the National Review Online, where he interviews writers about their books.

Earlier this week, Miller interviewed voice actor Kevin O’Brien on his book on tape production of The Innocence of Father Brown. You can listen to the interview here. I enjoy most of Miller’s interviews—he is quite a genial man, both online and in person, at least in the multiple talks and symposia that I have attended with him present. Yet, O’Brien comes across as more personable and humble than most of Miller’s guests—perhaps because he, as a dramatic interpreter, is more of a servant to a text than a creator. Hybris often accompanies creation, though I have known several intolerably arrogant actors in my life, as well. Perhaps, O’Brien is simply a good Christian who finds humility easily. Anyway, O’Brien has several interesting bits to say about Chesterton and his beloved Fr. Brown.

I like that O’Brien’s company is called Theater of the Word Incorporated—with a stress on the incarnational aspect of incorporated. To incorporate comes from the Latin word incorporare—to embody. I wish them well in their attempts to inject traditional Christian nutrients into the veins of American culture.

Posted by Joseph on Friday, December 26, Anno Domini 2008
Religion | Roman CatholicismComments
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